Insole Court Book Club – November

Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

This month, we took a slight departure from reading new releases to discuss the 1980’s classic, The Remains of the Day. It was lovely to catch up with the group again and welcome a new member, despite it being a dark and damp evening. As always, thoughts and further reading/watching below. Please feel free to comment. 


Nearly all of us had read it and finished it.

Heard Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson’s voices while reading it (the stars of the film).

Very slow-paced, could be a bit samey.

Some found it an easy read, but not massively engaging, due to a lack of action.

Dignified.Duty, dignity and grit come up many times throughout.

What has Steven’s missed out on? Does he know?

Back then, butler’s didn’t marry. But his father must have?

His mother is never mentioned.

Steven’s is an odd character, very set in his ways. 

Some still feel like its a love story. All that is unsaid. 

Some want to shake him! But also angry at the way he was treated by people. The classism. 

Some felt sad that it took a stranger to remind him to make the most of his time. 

The most English story ever. 

‘Too much Celt in me to enjoy it!’ in reference to Steven’s saying that only the English make good butlers.

Does Steven’s have autistic tendencies? Social awkwardness. 

His pride in how he managed his fathers death. Felt very tragic, despite the fact that he felt peace with it.

He has no social norm to adhere to as he doesn’t socialise and has no social group.

In some ways, he is self-aware. Analytical and critical.

Insight into the upper classes. 

Moderism/modernisation/transistion. Britain is changing.

There was immaturity on the side of Miss Kenton too. 

Sense of duty.

He didn’t leave the house whereas she did. 

He must have known what was going on with Darlington. 

Interesting that he always attributes opinions to others.

Similarities with Downton Abbey.

Wondered if some aspects were inspired by the book.

He’s a spectator. He compartmentalised everything.

The odd request of Steven’s to have the birds and the bees conversation. There to show that he has some awareness? A moment of dark humour.

Why doesn’t he correct the townspeople when they assume he’s a Lord of some sort. maybe he wants to spare their embarrassment?

Marked difference between when he is talking about his ‘tour’ compared to reflecting on the past.

He gains a wider perspective on the outside world. Freed from the job.

His lack of concern for her when her Aunt died!

Just hearing snippets of the Darlington story made us really intrigued. We would read a book about that!

A good picture of life as it was then.

Do people still have staff?

Steven’s and Miss Kenton were stuck in the social structure of the day.

Their jobs would have been desirable/sought after.

Faraday really seems taken with the English way of life.

She did love him. he would have infuriated her though, if they were together. He might have changed under her influence.

Hers was also a story of duty. Heart-breaking.

Never hear her perception. 

We then discussed whether we were satisfied with the ending, and then endings in general!

  • The Remains of the Day Film (plenty of Oscar noms!)
  • On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan
  • A Pale View of the Hills and An Artist of the Floating World (first two novels by Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro (very different)
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

For something completely different, we’ll be meeting on Tuesday 17th December to discuss The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner, with some mince pies! Our 2020 books are up now and should be in the Insole Court Visitors Centre before Christmas so plenty of time to get ahead of the game. 

Insole Court Book Club – October and birthday!

Amateur by Thomas Page McBee

Huge thank you to all those who braved the horribly dark and grim evening on Tuesday to come out and humour my excitement at the Book Club reaching the grand old age of one! It was lovely to have celebratory cake (rather than just our normal Tuesday cake) and a drink at the Maltsters afterwards, and as always, it was great to welcome new faces.

Amateur prompted some really fascinating discussions, which I’m not sure I managed to fully capture in short hand, but I’ll do my best!

When he talks about his own story, it is very compelling.

Some found the first section of the book quite hard-going.

Some really enjoyed the passages directly related to boxing.

Author was extremely self-aware and great at unpicking his own thoughts and feelings. Not typical in men?

For some, the book gave them an insight into the patriarchy and built in stereotypes. The assumption of competence being very interesting.

Such a unique perspective, not just because he is a trans man but also because of his ability to ‘pass’.

Many reflected on feeling like an ‘ornament’ around men; not listened to, talked over etc. and connected to the passages about feeling vulnerable on the streets, vulnerable in our own bodies.

Great insight into the mental/emotional transition.

F. Scott Fitzgerald: ‘The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.’

We loved the passages about his mum: ‘A golden core’

Similar to Born a Crime by Trevor Noah in that the mother is present throughout.

The physical touch and its acceptability in the boxing ring; tender and intimate.

The duality of the boxing ring.

Would love to hear what boxers think of this book.

Does that fact the he’s a journalist explain why the first section of the book felt a bit more disjointed?

Boxing is what makes it special, it wouldn’t have the same impact if he’d trained at tennis or joined a team sport. Boxing is such a good metaphor for life.

Really liked both of the coaches.

A great insight as we tend to see and hear from more trans women in the media.

The fact that McBee reports that every time he’s on TV, there’s always another man there to tell him why he’s not a man.

The argument that this offers ‘balance’. Some things don’t need balance. No-platforming.

The ‘snow-flake generation’ and the health and safety analogy. Just making sure people are safe.

Having to constantly out yourself, as well as there always being images online of you pre-transition. Removing images from Google, will become more of a thing in the future?

McBee is the masculinity expert for Vice.

Womens fear of men is ingrained. We are taught from a young age how to protect ourselves, boys not necessarily taught to look out for girls.

We really liked Jess.

Workplaces and emotional intelligence.

Maggie Nelson quote ‘sitting with someone uncurling his hands, then holding them out to you, open, so that you can behold all the hard-won strength, insight, agility and love to be found there’.

The ‘crisis of masculinity’ in America. Is it because of its unique culture? The Greatest Country in the World philosophy. What happens if you’re not living up to the ideal?

Further reading/watching/listening:

–          Man Alive by Thomas Page McBee

–          The Power of One by Bryce Courtney

–          The Fight by Norman Mailer

–          Million Dollar Baby by F.X Toole

–          Rethinking Masculinity on the Guardian Books Podcast

–          Seahorse: documentary

Please do comment below if you’ve read along and want to share your thoughts!

Looking forward to the next book club meeting on Tuesday 26th November where we’ll be discussing Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro. Keep an eye out for our 2020 book club pick, coming soon!

Kelly

Review-ish: The Assassins Quest by Robin Hobb (#3 in the Farseer Trilogy)

‘Sometimes a man doesn’t know how badly he’s hurt until someone else probes the wound.’

I’m basically just going to rhapsodise about this so please bear with me.

I have been recommending this trilogy to ANYone who will listen. It really is just perfectly constructed fantasy. I’m going to throw it out there, and I’m ready to bear the wrath, but I prefer it to the Game of Thrones books. Here’s why (and then I promise, I’ll actually talk about this particular book!):

–          The violence isn’t gratuitous

–          ALL of the characters are nuanced and are capable of growth

–          The magic is hard-won and not taken lightly

A huge amount happens in this final book of the trilogy. Its not so much a culmination of action, as the previous 2 books had plenty of that, but it does take us through what feels like the final part of this particular journey for Fitz. These books are huge. Finger-achingly and crampingly huge. But its all so necessary for the feeling that you get at the end. The big sigh. Questions are answered, some further questions are raised, but overall the narrative is extremely satisfying. 

As a central character, Fitz is more than worthy, offering us fist-bump opportunities as well as moments where we want to give him a good shake. The new characters that are introduced are fantastic (Starling and Kettle in particular) and the more familiar characters just grow and develop in sometimes quite unexpected ways. I won’t go too much further into the characters or plot, as if you haven’t already been sold by my review of #2, then this barely-a-review isn’t going to change your mind. And I’d rather that anyone who is interested, doesn’t have anything spoiled by me. Make sense? 

Its a testament to Hobb’s exceptional writing that upon finishing the Farseer Trilogy, the lad-at-home and I have sought out and started the next trilogy (The Liveship Traders) and have the following trilogy lined up (The Tawny Man Trilogy) so if I can keep up this sham of a review-site, you’re going to get a lot of Robin Hobb content. We also very nearly started a conversation with an unsuspecting woman on a beach in Portugal who was peacefully reading Robin Hobb unaware that we were excitedly whispering about confronting a fellow Hobb-nob and making her our friend.  Reader, we did not ruin that poor persons day, don’t worry.

I have been reading A LOT recently so the ol’ review back-log is significant at the moment. But the nights are drawing in, the leaves are falling and my favourite time of year commences so I WILL be getting my reviews in order.

Whats everyone reading at the moment? Does anyone read seasonally?? Im intruiged.

Kelly

Review-ish: The Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

Translated by Philip Gabriel.

‘The truth sometimes reminds me of city buried in sand. As time passes, the same piles up even thicker, and occasionally it’s blown away and what’s below is revealed.’

Sometimes, I really wish that I had read Murakami’s work in the order they were written, as I think I’d find it so fascinating. But alas, I read Norweigan Wood as a teenager and came to his others as I found them in libraries, charity shops or second-hand book shops. This is the most similar to Norwegian Wood that I have read so far. It lacks the totally nutty magic of Hard-Boiled Egg and Kafka on the Shore. But it’s still a very charming read.

I was convinced that I had found this book slow, but according to my notes, I was absolutely gripped by it! In this way, I think its an easier read than his more fantastical books, but it didn’t haunt me for weeks afterwards in the way The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle did. 

It felt like a meditation on the internal workings of someone’s mind. How easily it can be misled. A gentle story, really about one man, Tsukuru Tazaki, as he tries to reconcile his past with his present. I liked the slowness of it, which I think is  reflected its singular focus. I enjoyed how every moment was described in great detail, like his time at the lake. Murakami’s work is very evocative, but it was surprisingly enjoyable to feel this in stillness rather than action.

It offers a really interesting reflection on loneliness and isolation, comparing emptiness or unease in our own skin to physical or emotional colourlessness. Of feeling like you are the one that lacks personality when surrounded by bolder, more colourful people. And how reality can be very different to your own perception.

The language is more accessible than some of his other novels, but the lack of drama might put some readers off. I found his lyrical descriptions of music, particularly noticeable in this book, really beautiful and moving.

The characters, similar to in Norwegian Wood, are a little bit bleak, a little bit morose. But realistic, reflecting a different side to humanity. And as always, Murakami can create a fully-formed and 3D character in a few words. But he always allows you a deep-dive into his main characters sub-conscious.

There’s other Murakami books I might recommend first, depending on your interests, but if anyone is reading them in order, I’d love to hear about it!

Kelly

Insole Court Book Club – September

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Notes by the very wonderful Grace Capper who hosted last months meeting.

“Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. ”

On a wet Tuesday evening, with the summer a receding memory, there was a definite back-to-school feel to this month’s book club. Luckily, the book that was chosen for this month was a thoroughly enjoyable read filled with interesting discussion points and some ridiculously funny true stories. It was lovely to see some familiar faces, and welcome some new ones too. 

A summary of our discussion:

  • This is the first book that we have had in a long time where everyone in the group really liked it!
  • One of our members had listened to the book as an audiobook which was narrated by the author, which added an extra dimension as his use of different languages and accents is such an important element of the book which is harder to convey in print.
  • Apartheid as the setting for his early years. Growing up mixed race in apartheid and how this has shaped his life.
  • The segregation between Black/White/Coloured and how this labelling means something totally different in America. 
  • Belonging to different communities, and several places where this choice was made for him, and the difference when he was able to choose for himself eg school, jail, the ghetto
  • We discussed how various labels/signs can cause completely different reactions in different cultures and how easy it is to be completely unaware of how something is interpreted if you come from a different cultural background or lack historical knowledge eg There is a section in the book about how the name Hitler was fairly common in the black community in SA as European history was not taught as a priority in the black schools  – which set up a very, very funny anecdote that could not happen anywhere else. 
  • Trevor Noah was born in 1985. This sparked some debate on a couple of issues 
    • Shock at how recent apartheid was. When reading the book it felt like some of the incidents described belonged to a much older time.
    • For such a young person to have written an autobiography of his life already shows a remarkable life, and also a remarkable ability to reflect on it in a very considered way. This was followed by some discussion of terrible celebrity autobiographies written before the author had really done anything of note. Luckily this was not the case with this book!
  • How tragedy and comedy intertwine and how comedy can make it easier to discuss serious topics such as race
  • Domestic abuse and the lack of support from the police in reporting incidents and prosecuting his stepfather. Highlighted the institutionalised racism and sexism. Police attitudes throughout the book were very depressing.
  • The high level of violence in the book and how this affects relationships between the people in it
  • Some of the side characters were incredibly funny and memorable, there was an element of Delboy around some of them
  • His mother is an exceptional human being to have been able to raise him so well in such difficult circumstances and to have had such aspirations for him. 
  • The lack of father figures and male authority figures not being present or not being good people to look up to.
  • How he talked about the shooting and his stepfather was incredibly mature and nuanced
  • Discussion of meritocracy and access to resources and how he acknowledges that he needed help to get to where he is now “People love to say, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” What they don’t say is, “And it would be nice if you gave him a fishing rod.” That’s the part of the analogy that’s missing.”
  •  As the author he could have portrayed himself as more of a hero battling adversity throughout but he didn’t – the person he made the most fun of was himself, especially with his dating misadventures, and he was incredibly honest about his decision paying for his mother’s’ medical bills. The honesty made us warm to him more  
  • Was his mother’s survival a miracle?
  • There is a film being made of this book and a new book following on from it that is due out later this year.

Further reading/watching

Huge thanks again to Grace, and looking forward to catching up on Tuesday 29th October where we’ll be discussing Amateur by Thomas Page McBee, and celebrating our 1st birthday (more details to follow).

Review-ish: Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

”Silence becomes a woman’. Every women I’ve ever known was brought up on that saying.’

I’ve been aware of Pat Barker’s writing for years, having read her work in college (Regeneration I think) when studying First World War literature. But to be honest, I haven’t picked up anything of her since then. Until one of our Book Club members mentioned that she had, like Madeline Miller, been re-writing the Greek classics from a female perspective.

I brought this beautiful copy at Hay Festival where she was a speaker this year. I would have loved to have heard her speak and its given me the drive to take some time next year so get over to Hay more.

In all honesty, I read this a while a go now (I’m playing catch up on reviews) but the word one that sticks out still when I think of it is ‘brutal’. There’s much more blood, violence and brutality than Circe but then it follows the those affected by the Trojan War, rather than the squabbling of the Gods. There were moments that were hard to read.

It has made me consider trigger warnings. On Goodreads, many people asked about the incident of sexual assault in Circe, but other than questioning whether Silence of the Girls is appropriate for younger readers, there was a lot less discussion about trigger warnings, despite the fact that this novel contains many more incidents. I’d be really interested in discussing whether trigger warnings are necessary/important on novels further.

The title is powerful. Their silence is their strength. These women who are pawns, slaves and playthings in a war that saw them lose their brothers, sons, husbands and fathers. Barker flips the narrative, contrasting these steely women with passionate warriors that weep and throw their toys out of the pram at the drop of a hat.

Parker effectively uses italics to show the inner voice, from both sides. She manages to show so much nuance in the characters. Especially when Briseis is being struggled over by men on different sides of this tireless war.

The use of British vernacular did grate on me occasionally. But not enough to stop me from ploughing on. This book is definitely compelling. I wouldn’t say I enjoyed it, it was too violent for me to me to find enjoyment in it, but I couldn’t put it down. The writing is brilliant and all I expected from Barker.

I would whole-heartedly recommend it if you’ve been suckered into this sort of novel like I have. I assume that anyone picking up a novel based on Greek myths would expect a level of violence and would know what they’re getting themselves into. Why is it that reading about violence bothers me more at some times that others? Anyone else find this?

Kelly

Insole Court Book Club – August

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata. Translated by Ginny Tapley Takamori.

This months book club pick was recommended to me by a friend and has popped up in many discussions since then, and has been reviewed widely online. Its also lovely and short so perfect for a quick read during a busy Summer. It was lovely to welcome some new members to the group this month. As always, I’ll share a summary of our discussion below so that you can join in in the comments.

Reminded some of us of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine in the way that the characters think.. Eleanor was worse.

Keiko always wants to be better or normal. But the author never explicitly says whats ‘wrong’ with her.

Writing suggests that she is autistic but some behaviours don’t ring true.

‘On a different beat’. High functioning.

She’s just copying – observing behaviour.

True narrative or not?

The other characters also took on each others behaviours. We all do it with accents.

Strange as a child – extraordinary.

Quite sad that all she wanted was to be normal. Huge societal pressure.

Ending was quite odd.

Structure, transactional environment of the convenience store. She seemed happy here. Manual for life. She excelled. And she belonged.

Cultural differences between the UK and Japan.

How her social valued increased when she was ‘with’ Shiraha.

He was a user, exploitative. But was there mutual benefit? His words were awful. She shrugged it off.

Better to be unhappy in normal parameters. Expecting everyone to conform.

The convenience store as a distilled version of society at large.

Japanese culture more conservative than the UK. Conflict between a culture of working hard vs. a drop in population.

Was it written to shine a light on alternative ways of thinking/communicating? Raise questions?

Makes less sense if you’re not familiar with that culture.

Translation is very good. Had a conversation about how you tell tell when something is translated well.

Offense in different cultures. ‘Finishing schools’ for future ambassadors etc.

Its a natural desire to want to fit in.

What do you do? Being defined by your job.

Books written for neuro-divergent people about how to behave in social situations.

Discussion about the difficulty of how we talk in the UK. Use of colloquialisms and lack of directness. Challenging if you take things literally.

Keiko seems resilient, in control, quite happy. Shiraha seems like someone who just repeats things that he has seen/read, rather than actually being prejudice. Some believe he was genuinely manipulative. Some believe he lacked the ability (and charm) to be manipulative.

Changing generations and how acceptable language changes. What will we look back on in 50 years and find unbelievable? Homelessness, the environment.

Message at the end, you don’t need to conform.

  • Kathy Burke All Woman – Channel 4
  • Blinded by the Light (film)

Great discussions around this book and lots to think about. Next month (Tuesday 24th September) the book club will be meeting to discuss Born a Crime by Trevor Noah, now available in the Insole Court Visitors Centre.