Insole Court Book Club – September

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Notes by the very wonderful Grace Capper who hosted last months meeting.

“Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. ”

On a wet Tuesday evening, with the summer a receding memory, there was a definite back-to-school feel to this month’s book club. Luckily, the book that was chosen for this month was a thoroughly enjoyable read filled with interesting discussion points and some ridiculously funny true stories. It was lovely to see some familiar faces, and welcome some new ones too. 

A summary of our discussion:

  • This is the first book that we have had in a long time where everyone in the group really liked it!
  • One of our members had listened to the book as an audiobook which was narrated by the author, which added an extra dimension as his use of different languages and accents is such an important element of the book which is harder to convey in print.
  • Apartheid as the setting for his early years. Growing up mixed race in apartheid and how this has shaped his life.
  • The segregation between Black/White/Coloured and how this labelling means something totally different in America. 
  • Belonging to different communities, and several places where this choice was made for him, and the difference when he was able to choose for himself eg school, jail, the ghetto
  • We discussed how various labels/signs can cause completely different reactions in different cultures and how easy it is to be completely unaware of how something is interpreted if you come from a different cultural background or lack historical knowledge eg There is a section in the book about how the name Hitler was fairly common in the black community in SA as European history was not taught as a priority in the black schools  – which set up a very, very funny anecdote that could not happen anywhere else. 
  • Trevor Noah was born in 1985. This sparked some debate on a couple of issues 
    • Shock at how recent apartheid was. When reading the book it felt like some of the incidents described belonged to a much older time.
    • For such a young person to have written an autobiography of his life already shows a remarkable life, and also a remarkable ability to reflect on it in a very considered way. This was followed by some discussion of terrible celebrity autobiographies written before the author had really done anything of note. Luckily this was not the case with this book!
  • How tragedy and comedy intertwine and how comedy can make it easier to discuss serious topics such as race
  • Domestic abuse and the lack of support from the police in reporting incidents and prosecuting his stepfather. Highlighted the institutionalised racism and sexism. Police attitudes throughout the book were very depressing.
  • The high level of violence in the book and how this affects relationships between the people in it
  • Some of the side characters were incredibly funny and memorable, there was an element of Delboy around some of them
  • His mother is an exceptional human being to have been able to raise him so well in such difficult circumstances and to have had such aspirations for him. 
  • The lack of father figures and male authority figures not being present or not being good people to look up to.
  • How he talked about the shooting and his stepfather was incredibly mature and nuanced
  • Discussion of meritocracy and access to resources and how he acknowledges that he needed help to get to where he is now “People love to say, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” What they don’t say is, “And it would be nice if you gave him a fishing rod.” That’s the part of the analogy that’s missing.”
  •  As the author he could have portrayed himself as more of a hero battling adversity throughout but he didn’t – the person he made the most fun of was himself, especially with his dating misadventures, and he was incredibly honest about his decision paying for his mother’s’ medical bills. The honesty made us warm to him more  
  • Was his mother’s survival a miracle?
  • There is a film being made of this book and a new book following on from it that is due out later this year.

Further reading/watching

Huge thanks again to Grace, and looking forward to catching up on Tuesday 29th October where we’ll be discussing Amateur by Thomas Page McBee, and celebrating our 1st birthday (more details to follow).

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