insole court book club – january

The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

Another whopper of a book for this months book club. But generally well received, some found it gratuitous, some unputdownable. One book club member read us her favourite passage which can be found on Page 323, beginning with ‘Clara was still young…’

Really chuffed with how many people made it along considering the weather that was fore-casted and the bugs that have been going around. It was also lovely to welcome some new faces! As always, I have tried to capture some of the discussion points and suggested further reading, so feel free to join in the conversation in the Comments section below.

Secret, dark core of the Latin psyche.

So much in the book; politics, class, a family saga.

The political crescendo at the end.

Esteban Treubo: emotionally stunted.

Larger than life characters, not necessarily relate-able. Mythical.

Women’s roles in South America at the time (late 1890’s through to 1960’s).

Catholicism and the traditional society.

The fact that the country is never named.

The struggle for power. Venezuela today. Contemporary resonances.

Similar to Gothic novels and Victorian melodrama.

Men like Esteban can be found in Western literature. Very Dickensian.

Last line of the book being the same as the first. Symmetry and the cyclical nature of the story.

Strength of the women in the camp, a ray of light in the dark.

Clara, Blanca and Alba: all names suggest purity, clarity and innocence.

Nine years of muteness! Strength of character.

Suffragettes and corsets. Would like to have heard more of Nivea.

Symbolism and darkness reminded us to Kafka.

 

  • Love in the Time of Cholera, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor and 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • Maria Marin the play
  • Midnights Children and Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie

Have any of our lovely followers read any other books by Isabel Allende of any other female Latin authors? Would appreciate any further recommendations!

Our next book club book is Becoming by Michelle Obama, meeting on Tuesday 26th February, 7 – 8.30pm in the Reading Room at Insole Court House.

Kelly

insole court book club – december

Fingersmith by Sarah Waters
We had been a bit ambitious with only 3 weeks between meetings to try and get through this book, so understandably, there were a few members who hadn’t managed to finish it. With that in mind, the rest of us really tested ourselves by discussing themes AND avoiding spoilers. We agreed that the twists in this novel need to be experienced, so despite how very laid-back everyone was about it all, we committed to a spoiler-free meeting.
Again, it was lovely to have a cup of luke-warm mulled wine (my fault) in the beautiful Reading Room of the Insole Court House. As always, see below for some discussion points and thoughts on Fingersmith and some suggested further reading/watching.
Some of the Victorian language a bit irritating as its unexplained.
Story is good.
Discussed the theme of human trafficking, comparing it to today.
The idea of being out of your depth and totally isolated.
Who do you trust?
How innocent are people really?
Initial thoughts of Gentleman, a love-able rogue.
Loved the book jacket review ‘pea souper Gothic’.
Men play pivotal roles but plot devices only.
Liked the descriptions of the paths that people taken around the Briar.
Lant Street offers a weird stability.
The Uncle compared to Poirot but more of a bully.
Sue’s brother and sister in the Borough provide a contrast, they represent Borough-life.
Mrs Sucksby is considered a benign motherly figure. She has a lot of power as a working
class woman.
We compared her to the little power that Maud had as a more privileged woman.
  • Sarah Waters on Radio 4, chatting about Fingersmith, through BBC iplayer
  • Tipping the Velvet and The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters
  • The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

 

Have you got any <spoiler-free> thoughts on Fingersmith? Feel free to share below.

Our next book club book is The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende, meeting on Tuesday 29th January, 7 – 8.30/9pm, in the Reading Room of Insole Court House.

Kelly

 

 

insole court book club – november

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Pretty excited to be in the beautiful Reading Room of Insole Court House for Novembers book club meeting. The room really lends itself perfectly to a group discussion over a cuppa on a dark night. This month, we were discussing Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, so keep scrolling for thoughts, discussion points and suggested further reading from the group.

Great title.

Recognised ourselves in it.

Recognised the dominant people in our families.

Everyone in the novel is carrying baggage and secrets.

Very compelling to some members of the group, left others a bit cold.

We discussed ‘The American Dream’ and what life was like in America at that time from lived experience.

We talked about the lack of trickle down of the civil rights movement at that time. Progression not reaching the small towns.

We talked about WASPS (white, anglo-saxon and protestant) and about the fact that former President JFK was Catholic and therefore an outsider to some.

 

  • Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  • The Women’s Room by Marilyn French
  • Becoming by Michelle Obama

 

Please feel free to share your own thoughts and comments below, we’d love to continue the chats.

Our next book club book is Fingersmith by Sarah Waters , meeting on Tuesday 18th December,  7 – 9pm, in the Reading Room at Insole Court House.

 

Insole Court Book Club – October

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I was so delighted to run the very first Insole Court Book Club meeting on Tuesday and grateful to all of those who braved the cold and dark to join us for a chat. We discussed Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, our first book club book, which stimulated a lot of interesting discussions. As promised, I wanted to share some of the comments, thoughts and further reading/viewing that was suggested by the group.

Noting the star-crossed lovers…I didn’t care.

They’re not always right (In reference to the other characters).

Scene where Ifemelu gets her hair done, very entertaining and engaging.

How class plays out in it is very interesting.

The conversation around depression and mental health, something that isn’t acknowledged in Nigeria.

(In reference to Obinzi) he was a bit golder than gold. Too perfect.

Oh shit, I’m not Kimberley am I?

The grass is always greener.

Its a privilege to hear a female writer talk about these issues.

The book will date due to Trump’s America.

  • Roots by Alex Haley
  • Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge
  • Hamilton the Musical
  • Black Earth Rising on BBC
  • The Dock of the Bay on ITV

 

Please feel free to comment below and continue the discussion!

Our next book club book is Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, and the meeting is on Tuesday 27th November, 7 – 9pm.