Insole Court Book Club – August

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata. Translated by Ginny Tapley Takamori.

This months book club pick was recommended to me by a friend and has popped up in many discussions since then, and has been reviewed widely online. Its also lovely and short so perfect for a quick read during a busy Summer. It was lovely to welcome some new members to the group this month. As always, I’ll share a summary of our discussion below so that you can join in in the comments.

Reminded some of us of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine in the way that the characters think.. Eleanor was worse.

Keiko always wants to be better or normal. But the author never explicitly says whats ‘wrong’ with her.

Writing suggests that she is autistic but some behaviours don’t ring true.

‘On a different beat’. High functioning.

She’s just copying – observing behaviour.

True narrative or not?

The other characters also took on each others behaviours. We all do it with accents.

Strange as a child – extraordinary.

Quite sad that all she wanted was to be normal. Huge societal pressure.

Ending was quite odd.

Structure, transactional environment of the convenience store. She seemed happy here. Manual for life. She excelled. And she belonged.

Cultural differences between the UK and Japan.

How her social valued increased when she was ‘with’ Shiraha.

He was a user, exploitative. But was there mutual benefit? His words were awful. She shrugged it off.

Better to be unhappy in normal parameters. Expecting everyone to conform.

The convenience store as a distilled version of society at large.

Japanese culture more conservative than the UK. Conflict between a culture of working hard vs. a drop in population.

Was it written to shine a light on alternative ways of thinking/communicating? Raise questions?

Makes less sense if you’re not familiar with that culture.

Translation is very good. Had a conversation about how you tell tell when something is translated well.

Offense in different cultures. ‘Finishing schools’ for future ambassadors etc.

Its a natural desire to want to fit in.

What do you do? Being defined by your job.

Books written for neuro-divergent people about how to behave in social situations.

Discussion about the difficulty of how we talk in the UK. Use of colloquialisms and lack of directness. Challenging if you take things literally.

Keiko seems resilient, in control, quite happy. Shiraha seems like someone who just repeats things that he has seen/read, rather than actually being prejudice. Some believe he was genuinely manipulative. Some believe he lacked the ability (and charm) to be manipulative.

Changing generations and how acceptable language changes. What will we look back on in 50 years and find unbelievable? Homelessness, the environment.

Message at the end, you don’t need to conform.

  • Kathy Burke All Woman – Channel 4
  • Blinded by the Light (film)

Great discussions around this book and lots to think about. Next month (Tuesday 24th September) the book club will be meeting to discuss Born a Crime by Trevor Noah, now available in the Insole Court Visitors Centre.

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