Insole Court Book Club – July

Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

This months book club book was picked through a conversation around one of our previous books (for the life of me, I can’t remember which book led us to this one but it has been a while!). I had heard very polarised viewpoints about Rooney’s writing so I was interested to see what people thought! 

Thoughts below. And please get involved in the discussion using the comments box.

Easier to read than others we have read recently. Holiday read.

Quite stylised, took a while to get used to. Author born in 1991. Conscious of that.

Quite realistic which makes it hard at times.I hate you and all your friends.

Pretentious characters. Deliberate choice by author.Possibility that we were like that too at 21.

Normal People quite similar. Could be same characters.

Frances doesn’t feel anything. Everything’s ironic. Trendy.

References (bands and books) used to place it at a time and place. Cool points!

‘Landscape paintings are patriarchal’.

Interesting that Frances downloads and goes back through her texts. 

Nick made to sound so old, despite only being in early 30’s. A very early 20’s perspective.

Privilege of many of the characters and how it rubs off on Frances. Doesn’t want to work, like the others.

We read that it was written in 3 months and discussed whether you can tell. Did she start writing it, not know where it was going to go? Imitating life?

Frances is emotionally dull. Is this to allow you to put your own emotions on her?

Relationship with Dad, emotionally shut down to cope with. What does she then look for from Nick? Attention, which comes in scraps. All a big game.

Discussion around a point made in this article comparing Rooney’s Capitalism to Joyce’s Catholicism.

Is setting in in Ireland critical? Some thought so. Biggest boom and bust. Impacted on people like Frances and her family.

She’s distrustful, but also in awe of glamorous lifestyles. Discussed who had more power. Beginning= Bobbi, end = Frances. A toxic relationship but quite realistic.

A shared history that you can’t separate from. 

Is it a coming of age story? We didn’t think so as no one grows.

Talked about Nick as a character. Why doesn’t she mention which character he plays in Hamlet? It would have given us an idea of his career.

A very passive character. If this book were written 30 years ago, the story would have centred on him. 

Would the story have been different if Nick had been a woman? A different sort of power struggle/jealousy.

Melissa’s email to Frances was devastating. Why was she so interested in Bobbi and Frances?

Frances is not reliable as a person, let alone as a narrator. Very hypocritical. 

‘You can’t be unemotional. It’s like saying you don’t have thoughts’.

Frances writes with more nuance that she portrays in person. Is it a generational thing? Do that age group communicate better through technology?

Overated perhaps, but we liked it. Would recommend to some people. Works as a holiday read.

Liked Mum and Bobbi. We’d hang out with her. 

Lack of quotation marks blurs lines between whats real and whats not. He said, she said. We know that Rooney debated at Uni and it shows. Not a realistic form of dialogue, one step removed from the conversation.

Brief discussion about women written by men, and men written by women. Our cultural conditioning. 

No recommendations this month but all reading lots of interesting books. Anyone want to share there current reads below?

Next months book club meeting is on Tuesday 27th August where we’ll be discussing Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata.

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